Blogs

roundcube's picture

Update 1.0.3 released

We’re proud to announce the next service release to the stable version 1.0.
It contains some bug fixes and improvements we considered important for the
long term support branch of Roundcube.

It’s considered stable and we recommend to update all productive installations
of Roundcube with this version. Download it from roundcube.net/download,
see the full changelog here.

Please do backup before updating!

tobru's picture

CASino with Kolab LDAP backend


Contents

CASino is an easy to use Single Sign On (SSO) web application written in Ruby”

It supports different authentication backends, one of it is LDAP. It works very well with the
LDAP backend of Kolab. Just put the following configuration snippet into
your config/cas.yml:

production:
  authenticators:
    kolab:
      authenticator: 'LDAP'
      options:
        host: 'localhost'
        port: 389
        base: 'ou=People,dc=mydomain,dc=tld'
        username_attribute: 'uid'
        admin_user: 'uid=kolab-service,ou=Special Users,dc=mydomain,dc=tld'
        admin_password: 'mykolabservicepassword'
        extra_attributes:
          email: 'mail'
          fullname: 'uid'

You are now able to sign in using your Kolab uid and manage SSO users with the nice
Kolab Webadmin LDAP frontend.

Timotheus Pokorra's picture

Installing Demo Version of Kolab 3.3 with Docker

This describes how to install a docker image of Kolab.

Please note: this is not meant to be for production use. The main purpose is to provide an easy way for demonstration of features and for product validation.

This installation has not been tested a lot, and could still use some fine tuning. This is just a demonstration of what could be done with Docker for Kolab.

Preparing for Docker
I am using a Jiffybox provided by DomainFactory for downloading a Docker container for Kolab 3.3 running on CentOS 6.

I have installed Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on a Jiffybox.
I am therefore following Docker Installation instructions for Ubuntu for the installation instructions:

Install a kernel that is required by Docker:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install linux-image-generic-lts-raring linux-headers-generic-lts-raring

After that, in the admin website of JiffyBox, select the custom kernel Bootmanager 64 Bit (pvgrub64); see also the german JiffyBox FAQ. Then restart your JiffyBox.

After the restart, uname -a should show something like:

Linux j89610.servers.jiffybox.net 3.8.0-37-generic #53~precise1-Ubuntu SMP Wed Feb 19 21:37:54 UTC 2014 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

Now install docker:

Timotheus Pokorra's picture

Building a Docker container for Kolab 3.3 on Jiffybox

This article is an update of the previous post that built a Docker container for Kolab 3.1: Building a Docker container for Kolab on Jiffybox (March 2014)

Preparation
I am using a Jiffybox provided by DomainFactory for building a Docker container for Kolab 3.3 running on CentOS 6.

I have installed Ubuntu 12.04 LTS on a Jiffybox.
I am therefore following Docker Installation instructions for Ubuntu for the installation instructions:

Install a kernel that is required by Docker:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install linux-image-generic-lts-raring linux-headers-generic-lts-raring

After that, in the admin website of JiffyBox, select the custom kernel Bootmanager 64 Bit (pvgrub64); see also the german JiffyBox FAQ. Then restart your JiffyBox.

After the restart, uname -a should show something like:

Linux j89610.servers.jiffybox.net 3.8.0-37-generic #53~precise1-Ubuntu SMP Wed Feb 19 21:37:54 UTC 2014 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

Now install docker:

roundcube's picture

Roundcube Next – If we would start over again

Roundcube indeed became a huge success story with tens of thousands of installations worldwide. Something I never expected back in 2005 when I started the project as a fresh alternative to the well established but already aged free webmail packages like SquirrelMail or Horde IMP. And now, some 9 years later, we find ourselves in a similar position as the ones we previously wanted to replace. Although we managed to adapt the Roundcube codebase to the ongoing technological innovations, the core architecture is still ruled by the concepts which seemed to be right back when we started. And we’re talking about building a web app for IE 5 and Netscape 6 when browsers weren’t as capable and performant as they are today and when the term AJAX has not yet been known nor did we have nifty libraries such a jQuery or Backbone.js at hand.

It more often happens that, when discussing the implementation of new features to Roundcube, we find ourselves saying “Oh man, that’s going to be an expensive endeavor to squeeze this into our current architecture! If we could just…”. This doesn’t mean that the entire codebase is crap, not at all! But sometimes you just silently wish to give the core a fresh touch which respects the increased requirements and expectations. And that’s the challenge of every software product that has been around for a while and is still intensively developed.

When looking around, I see inspiring new webmail projects slowly emerging which don’t carry the legacy of a software product designed almost a decade ago. I’m truly happy about this development and I appreciate the efforts of honest coders to create the next generation of free webmail software. On the other hand it also makes me a bit jealous to see others starting from scratch and building fast and responsive webmail clients like Mailpile or RainLoop which make Roundcube look like the old dinosaur. Although they’re not yet as feature rich as Roundcube, the core concepts are very convincing and perfectly fit the technological environment we find ourselves in today.

AMaViS, SpamAssassin, roundcube and mySQL – a wedding story

Some time ago I blogged about fighting spam with amavis for the Kolab community. Now the story continues by means of the roundcube integration with amavis.

As earlier mentioned spamassassin is able to store recipient-based preferences in a mysql table with some settings in its local.cf (see spamassassin wiki)

# Spamassassin for Roundcubemail
# http://www.tehinterweb.co.uk/roundcube/#pisauserprefs
user_scores_dsn DBI:mysql:ROUNDCUBEMAILDBNAME:localhost:3306
user_scores_sql_password ROUNCUBEMAILPASSWORD
user_scores_sql_username ROUNDCUBEMAILDBUSERNAME
user_scores_sql_custom_query SELECT preference, value FROM _TABLE_ WHERE username = _USERNAME_ OR username = '$GLOBAL' OR username = CONCAT('%',_DOMAIN_) ORDER BY username ASC

However, accessing this with amavis is a real bis problem for many users. Amavis has it’s own user-based configuration policies, but email-plugins as the roundcubemail plugin sauserprefs often only use spamassassin and not amavis. Originally, SA was only called once per message by amavis and therefore recipient-based preferences were not possible at all. This has changed. Now you can use the options @sa_userconf_maps and @sa_username_maps to perform such lookups. Unfortunately these options are still poorly documented. We use them anyway.

The values in @sa_userconf_maps define where amavis has to look for the user preferences. I use mySQL lookups for all recipient addresses.

Andreas Cordes's picture

Kolab 3.3 now available for Raspberry Pi

Hi,

now I finished compiling all the +Kolab.org packages for the +Raspberry Pi . Just a short note that you can update your groupware on your Pi pto the most recent version of +Kolab.org .

Greetz

Kolab 3.2 for Gentoo is ready to rumble

Just in time for the official Kolab 3.3 release, our Gentoo packages for Kolab 3.2 became stable and ready to use. This will clear the way for the upcoming release of Kolab 3.3 for Gentoo. Altough this release won't bring any major changes, it prepares the ground for upcoming developments and new features in Kolab 3.3. Further, with Kolab 3.2 we introduced an upgrade path between Kolab releases for Gentoo and we will try our best to keep updates as consistent and comfortable as possible.
Read more ...

tobru's picture

Kolab 3 Vagrant box with Puppet provisioning


Contents

Kolab has released it’s first beta of the upcoming version 3.3.
To test it on Debian I’ve created a Vagrantfile and a small Puppet module which provisions Kolab into a Debian VM. It’s available
on Github.

How to use it

Make sure you have the latest Vagrant version installed. Please see the official documentation.
Clone the git repository with git clone https://github.com/tobru/kolab3-vagrant.git and change into this directory.
Then run vagrant up and wait a while until Vagrant and Puppet have done their jobs. When it’s finished you’re good to enter the VM with vagrant ssh.
To have a working Kolab installation, setup-kolab needs to be called as root (hint: sudo su) once. It configures the Kolab components.
The Kolab Web Admin Panel is now reachable under http://localhost:8080/kolab-webadmin and Roundcube under
http://localhost:8080/roundcubemail.

For more information about how Vagrant works, have a look at the official Getting Started guide.

Chose the Kolab version

By default Kolab will be installed from the development repository where all the latest (and maybe broken) packages are located. To install
a different version, just change the version parameter in manifests/default.pp to the desired version.

Andreas Cordes's picture

Updating from 3.2 to 3.3 beta1

Hello,

I just finished the compiling of all modules and performed an upgrade to 3.3 beta1 on +Rasperry Pi .

For all impatient:

deb http://kolab.zion-control.org /

Changes I adopted to my installation :

/etc/kolab/kolab.conf

[wallace]
modules = resources, invitationpolicy, footer 
kolab_invitation_policy = ACT_ACCEPT_IF_NO_CONFLICT:zion-control.org, ACT_MANUAL